Unreal Engine 4 Source Code Released

unrealengine.com/

Let the learning begin! \o/

That’s godlike. I can imagine Epic saying “This hurts you” to Unity :smiling_imp:

Of course, Unity and others are proven solutions that work right now, while UE4 is going to take time.

But need buy to view the code

Now everyone can have shaders that make their characters look like they just got out of the shower.

I think Epic just got a lot of $19 payments :slight_smile:

Though the conspiracy theorist in me wonders whether this means that Epic actually value this iteration of their engine less, and will deliberately not use as much effort to it, as during UE3 this kind of licensing would have been out of the question.

One off payment and full access but no updates. Not bad epic, not bad.

I think its more that most other major engines (cry, source, unity, etc) are now on a similar or free model and so decided it was a good step to stay competitive and appeal to the indie market more.

Read this:

-What modifications can I make to the source code?
You can extend it, modify it, fork it, or integrate it with other software or libraries, with one exception: You can?t combine the Unreal Engine code with code covered by a ?Copyleft? license agreement which would directly or indirectly require the Unreal Engine to be governed by terms other than the EULA. For example:

 Software licensed under the GNU General Public License (GPL), Lesser GPL (LGPL) (unless you are merely dynamically linking a shared library), or Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License is Copyleft Code.
 Software licensed under the BSD License, MIT License, Microsoft Public License, or Apache License is not Copyleft Code.

-Can I share the Unreal Engine source code or tools with others?
You can share the source code or tools, along with any modifications you?ve made, with anyone who is an Unreal Engine licensee who is authorized to access the same version of the engine as yours, e.g. the 4.x.x version number of your installed build.

-Can I copy and paste the Unreal Engine code into my own project or engine?
If you use any Unreal Engine code in your product (even just a little), then your entire product is governed by the EULA, and royalties are due.

-Can I study and learn from the Unreal Engine code, and then utilize that knowledge in writing my own game or competing engine?
Yes, as long as you don?t copy any of the code. Code is copyrighted, but knowledge is free!

Your subscription payment automatically recurs, but you?re free to cancel at any time. There?s no penalty for cancellation.

When you cancel your subscription, you won?t receive access to future releases of Unreal Engine 4, however your login will remain active, and you are free to continue using the versions of Unreal Engine 4 which you obtained as a subscriber under the terms of the EULA.

Don’t say if after some months you can subscribe again.

Someone going to buy this month?
(No linux version fail)

Yes, I just subscribed due to curiosity. There’s about 45 MB of .cpp files and 20 MB of .h files, so Urho has still some distance to go: we have 3.5 MB own .cpp files and 1.5 MB own .h files respectively :slight_smile:

The UE4 code is such a monster that it would take days to begin to understand its internals, so I don’t think I’m going to spend much time on it. What I don’t understand is how the hell can they compile the runtime to JavaScript in HTML5 deployment mode and have any kind of sane filesize for the resulting script, even if severely shortened / obfuscated :nerd:

[quote=“cadaver”]Yes, I just subscribed due to curiosity. There’s about 45 MB of .cpp files and 20 MB of .h files, so Urho has still some distance to go: we have 3.5 MB own .cpp files and 1.5 MB own .h files respectively :slight_smile:

The UE4 code is such a monster that it would take days to begin to understand its internals, so I don’t think I’m going to spend much time on it. What I don’t understand is how the hell can they compile the runtime to JavaScript in HTML5 deployment mode and have any kind of sane filesize for the resulting script, even if severely shortened / obfuscated :nerd:[/quote]

The size don’t is all.

Work in VS 2012 Express ?
I need new graphic card xD

They recommend to use VS2013. If you use VS2012 you will need to make some changes and download additional dependency files. I’d prefer VS2013 anyway, as it looks nicer and runs better. Note that I haven’t tried compiling yet so I’m not sure if the VS Express version works.

Yes youtube.com/watch?v=usjlNHPn-jo 2013 express is fine :smiley:

Never though I would be able to access the unreal 4 source for $20.
Can’t wait until I finish the project(nothing game related) that’s been keeping me from urho3d.
Then I could dig into unreal 4 for the benefit of urho3d course… I may never make it back out though. :stuck_out_tongue:

No subscription from me until I see the little penguin showing its head on their website.

xD
Looks like the contributors need port to linux

It’s funny because as my memory goes on, the 1st Unreal Engine was Linux compatible, well, at least the server engine.
I also think it was one of those first engines to use SDL at this time and easily “wine” compatible…

Unreal Engine 4 supports Linux and Valve?s Steam Box efforts from Day 1

muktware.com/2014/03/unreal- … ay-1/23300

Despite what the title says, that article only mentions “Linux” twice. In the title and in the last line at the bottom of the story which says:

However, on the Unreal Engine website it states this:

[quote]
SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS:
Desktop PC or Mac
Windows 7 64-bit or Mac OS X 10.9.2 or later
Quad-core Intel or AMD processor, 2.5 GHz or faster
NVIDIA GeForce 470 GTX or AMD Radeon 6870 HD series card or higher
8 GB RAM[/quote]
And clearly there is no sign of “Tux” in their home page.

Could anyone here that already seen the source code confirm whether the UE4 engine and tool support Linux platform or not. I would really hate to waste my hard earned money.

Are working in, but not supported for now

About the Linux support:

From what I can see the editor isn’t supported but the runtime has some build steps that are Linux-related, but would only build on Windows via .Net or Mac via Mono. It isn’t polished and there is indeed SDL in the ThirdParty directories but I don’t think it is linked up in the runtime part yet for the audio or GL renderer context-creation, but it looks trivial to implement as you can see how they target Mac/Windows backends. Getting the build system to work on Linux+Mono would take some time though, and changing any Mac defines as more or less posix/unix defines instead where it makes sense. Also the required compressed blobs have lots of pre-compiled libraries that you would need to make yourself and chase around for ThirdParty source code.

About the engine:

As their FAQ/EULA says, knowledge is power so learning bits from their engine can only benefit projects like Urho3D. :slight_smile: Getting BRDF and physically correct shaders working in Urho sounds like one side project I’d like to do, and reflections and things for shader model 5 platforms.

Something like blueprint would be a great alternative to scripting, and could be achieved in the Urho3D editor as all the building blocks are there (attributes, loads of events, data i/o via variants, util functions for math, etc.), we would just need to make a node editor gui (logic brick editor gui to not confuse Urho3D’s existing node object) and serialise it to XML/Binary the flow graphs that could be auto-converted to C++ code via filling up a LogicComponent base class or something crazy for any given nodes, then getting your compiler to build it behind the scenes via the editor? :slight_smile: Not sure how you would get hot-reload to work though…

[quote=“boberfly”]About the Linux support:

From what I can see the editor isn’t supported but the runtime has some build steps that are Linux-related, but would only build on Windows via .Net or Mac via Mono. It isn’t polished and there is indeed SDL in the ThirdParty directories but I don’t think it is linked up in the runtime part yet for the audio or GL renderer context-creation, but it looks trivial to implement as you can see how they target Mac/Windows backends. Getting the build system to work on Linux+Mono would take some time though, and changing any Mac defines as more or less posix/unix defines instead where it makes sense. Also the required compressed blobs have lots of pre-compiled libraries that you would need to make yourself and chase around for ThirdParty source code.[/quote]

Thanks Alex F. for the summary. I guess patience is a virtue. I will wait till they officially support Linux and make a one-off subscription to grab the code.